Curators

Clair Rowden

Clair Rowden is Reader in Musicology in the School of Music, Cardiff University. Her research deals mainly with opera and nineteenth-century France (especially Massenet), and she collaborated with Richard Langham Smith for the new edition of Carmen (Peters Edition). Recent publications include the co-edited volume (with Michela Niccolai) Musical Theatre in Europe 1830-1945 (Brepols, 2017), and the edited collection Performing Salome, Revealing Stories (Ashgate Interdisciplinary Studies in Opera, 2013). She has published widely on the critical reception of opera, stage production, dance, iconography and caricature.

Contact: rowdencs@cardiff.ac.uk

Richard Langham Smith

Richard Langham Smith has published widely on French music, particularly on Debussy and Carmen. Professor at The Royal College of Music, he is co-author of the Cambridge Opera Handbook on Pelléas et Mélisande; a substantial contributor to the Overture Opera Guide to Carmen and the New Grove Dictionary of Opera. His reconstruction of Debussy’s ‘other’ opera, Rodrigue et Chimène is published in the Debussy Œuvres completes and his edition of Carmen, including much material from the staging manuals, is published by Peters Edition.

Contact: richard.langhamsmith@rcm.ac.uk

Contributors

David Cranmer

David Cranmer is assistant professor at the Musicology Department of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa. At the Centro de Estudos da Sociologia e Estética Musical (CESEM), he coordinates the research group ‘Music in the Modern Period’ and the thematic strand ‘Luso-Brazilian Studies’. He is also responsible for the Marcos Portugal project and for the international network Caravelas – the Study Group for the History of Luso-Brazilian Music. In recent years he has devoted himself particularly to research into aspects of opera and theatre music in Portugal and Brazil in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Contact: cranmer@fcsh.unl.pt

Elizabeth Kertesz

Elizabeth Kertesz is a research fellow at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne. She has just completed a monograph with Michael Christoforidis, entitled Carmen and the Staging of Spain (due out in the first quarter of 2018 with Oxford University Press). Her current research interests include Spanish-themed music, entertainment and film from the Belle Epoque into the first half of the twentieth century.

Contact: ekertesz@unimelb.edu.au

Michael Christoforidis

Michael Christoforidis lectures in Musicology at the University of Melbourne. He has published extensively on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spanish music and dance, and its impact on Western culture. Other research interests include the impact of the visual arts upon musical modernism, issues of national identity and exoticism in music, and the history of the acoustic guitar. He currently has two monographs in production: Manuel de Falla and Visions of Spanish Music (Routledge) and Carmen and the Staging of Spain (with Elizabeth Kertesz, Oxford University Press).

Contact: mchri@unimelb.edu.au

Martin Nedbal

Martin Nedbal is Assistant Professor of Musicology at the University of Kansas. His first book, Morality and Viennese Opera in the Age of Mozart and Beethoven, was published by Routledge in 2016. He has also published articles on the operas of Smetana and Dvorák, and contributed to the Oxford Handbook of Music Censorship. He is currently working on a book about the reception of Mozart’s operas in nineteenth-century Prague.

Contact: mnedbal@ku.edu

Lola San Martín Arbide

Lola San Martín Arbide is a Junior Research Fellow in Musicology at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, where she is working on a book-length project on Parisian urban landscapes in music during the Third Republic. She has published on Erik Satie, sound walking and mapping, music and literature, and is particularly interested in cross-media intersections between music and the other arts. From September 2018 until 2020 she will be a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS), in Paris.

Contact: lola.sanmartin@music.ox.ac.uk

Naomi Matsumoto

Naomi Matsumoto holds postgraduate qualifications in vocal performance and an MA and a PhD in historical musicology. She is currently a Lecturer in Music at Goldsmiths’ College, University of London, and is working on Italian opera of the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries.

Contact: n.matsumoto@gold.ac.uk

Michela Niccolai

Michela Niccolai holds a Ph.D. in Musicology (Saint-Étienne/Pavia). Recent publications include La Dramaturgie de Gustave Charpentier (2011); Giacomo Puccini et Albert Carré: “Madame Butterfly” à Paris (2012, 1er prix ‘Gouden Label’ Award 2014, Klassiek Centraal); Debussy’s “Pelléas et Mélisande”: The Staging by Albert Carré (2017). She is currently collaborateur scientifique at the Laboratoire de Musicologie (Université Libre de Bruxelles) and membre associé at the IHRIM (Université Lyon 2) and teaches at both universities Paris IV and Paris III.

Contact: michela.niccolai@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

Charlotte Bentley

Charlotte Bentley is Junior Research Fellow at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, having completed her AHRC-funded doctoral studies at the University of Cambridge in 2017. Her doctoral project explores the production and reception of French opera in New Orleans between 1819 and 1859.

Contact: cab96@cam.ac.uk

Renata Suchowiejko

Renata Suchowiejko is Professor of Musicology at Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. She is Head of the Music Department at the Institute of Musicology. She has published extensively on nineteenth-century violin music, in particular on Henryk Wieniawski’s life and works. Other research concentrates on musical migrations, cultural transfer, questions of national and international identity in European music, and cultural encounters between Poland and France, Belgium and Russia. She recently received a National Science Centre Grant for ‘The Presence of Polish Music and Musicians in the Artistic Life of Interwar Paris’.

Contact: renata.suchowiejko@uj.edu.pl

Jann Pasler

Jann Pasler, Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego, specializes in music in its social and political, colonial and postcolonial contexts in Third Republic France as well as the former French empire, especially North Africa, Senegal, and Vietnam. Her Composing the Citizen: Music as Public Utility in Third Republic France (University of California Press, 2009) won the ASCAP Deems Taylor prize in 2010, and its French version, La République, la musique et le citoyen, 1871-1914 (Editions Gallimard, 2015), the Prix de l’essai in 2016. Currently she is writing Sounding the French Empire: Colonial Ethnographies of Music and New Media, 1860s-1960s.

Contact: jpasler@ucsd.edu

Image by Editions Gallimard

Paul Rodmell

Paul Rodmell is a Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Music at the University of Birmingham.  He is the author of monographs on Charles Villiers Stanford (2002) and Opera in the British Isles 1875–1918 (2013); he has also published research on music various aspects of British musical culture in the nineteenth century; he is currently working on a study of the cultural transfer of French music in Britain in the same period.

Contact: p.j.rodmell.mus@bham.ac.uk

Bruno Forment

Bruno Forment is the author and editor of (Dis)embodying Myths in Ancient Régime Opera (Leuven, 2012), Theatrical Heritage: Challenges and Opportunities (Leuven, 2015) and Zwanenzang van een illusie (Kortrijk, 2016), as well as of numerous articles and book chapters on opera and stage design between the seventeenth and early twentieth century. In 2008, he discovered the ‘Dubosq’ collection, Europe’s largest collection of historical stage sets, which since then has been recognised as ‘top heritage’ by the Flemish Ministry of Culture.

Contact: bruno.forment@hogent.be

Sabine Teulon Lardic

Sabine Teulon Lardic holds a doctorate in Musicology from the Sorbonne and is a researcher at the CRISES Laboratory at the University of Montpellier III. She has published numerous articles on nineteenth-century opera, as well as researching musical practice in the Provence-Languedoc region. Recent publications include Inventer le concert public à Montpellier : la Société de Concerts Symphoniques (1890–1903) (Symétrie, 2014), and the co-edited volume (with Jean-Christophe Branger) Provence et Languedoc à l’opéra en France au 19e siècle (Presses universitaires Saint-Etienne, 2017).

Contact: sabine.teulon-lardic@ville-nimes.fr

Kerry Rosaleen Murphy

Kerry Murphy is Professor and Head of Musicology at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, The University of Melbourne. She has published widely on nineteenth-century French music and music criticism and colonial Australian music history. She is currently researching the impact of travelling virtuosi and opera troupes to Australia and the Australian music publisher and patron, Louise Hanson-Dyer.

Contact: kerryrm@unimelb.edu.au

Kristen M. Turner

Kristen M. Turner received her doctorate in musicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and now lectures in the music department at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. Dr. Turner is currently working on a monograph about race and the use of opera in American popular staged musical entertainments.

Contact: kristen_turner@ncsu.edu

Michelle Assay

Michelle Assay completed her PhD at the Université de Paris Sorbonne and the University of Sheffield, with the thesis ‘Hamlet in the Stalin era and Beyond: Stage and Score’, currently in revision for publication. Flagship Conferences Coordinator for the Royal Musical Association, she is co-editor of a recently published selection of letters and diaries of Carl Nielsen, and is currently collaborating with David Fanning on an expanded life-and-works study of the Polish-born Soviet composer, Mieczysław Weinberg.

Contact: michelle.assay@sheffield.ac.uk

Laura Moeckli

Laura Moeckli obtained her PhD from the University of Bern in 2015 with a thesis on recitative in nineteenth-century German and French opera. Her current research areas include nineteenth-century opera performance and reception, transatlantic interaction in early twentieth-century music, and operatic temporality.

Contact: laura.moeckli@hkb.bfh.ch

Jennifer Millar

Jennifer Millar is Associate Lecturer at the Open University, and focuses on interdisciplinary arts, music and literature studies in her teaching activities. Her 2011 PhD, entitled ‘Regionalist Themes in Breton Operas, 1850–1954’ discusses the role of French opera in establishing, rehearsing and maintaining interacting regional and national cultural identities. Research topics include musical allusions in the nineteenth-century novel (particularly by John Meade Falkner), Breton ethnic music and folk literature, and the high-art products inspired by them.

Contact: jennifermillar659@btinternet.com

Nicole K. Strohmann

Nicole K. Strohmann is lecturer in historical musicology at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien in Hannover. Her doctoral dissertation was published as Gattung, Geschlecht und Gesellschaft im Frankreich des ausgehenden 19. Jahrhunderts: Studien zur Dichterkomponistin Augusta Holmès (Olms, 2012). Her research focuses on nineteenth-century French music and opera, the Hanoverian court opera, gender studies, mobility and cultural exchange of music and musicians, and the history of culture and reception. She recently co-edited the volume Bühnenrollen und Identitätskonzepte. Karrierestrategien von Künstlerinnen im Theater des 19. Jahrhunderts (Wehrhahn, 2016).

Contact: nicole.Strohmann@hmtm-hannover.de

Ulla-Britta Broman-Kananen

Ulla-Britta Broman-Kananen is a researcher at the University of Arts, Sibelius Academy in Finland where her work focuses on operatic history of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Research projects include the Academy of Finland-funded ‘The Finnish Opera Company (1873–1879) from a Microhistorical Perspective: Performance Practices, Multiple Narrations, and Polyphony of Voice’, and Opera on the Move: Transnational Practices and Touring Artists in the Long 19th Century Norden, funded by NOS-HS (Joint committee for Nordic Research Councils in the Humanities and Social Sciences).

Contact: ulla-britta.broman-kananen@uniarts.fi

Matthew Franke

Matthew Franke is the Coordinator of Music History at Howard University in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. in musicology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2014), with a dissertation focusing on the Italian reception of the operas of Jules Massenet. He has published essays and reviews in Notes, Perspectives on Europe, and the Indiana Theory Review.

Contact: matthew.franke@howard.edu

Linda Buckley

Linda Buckley obtained an undergraduate degree in theology before completing her musicological studies with a doctoral thesis on ‘Alfred Bruneau and the Third French Republic’. A book examining Bruneau’s role in the Dreyfus Affair is forthcoming. Linda is an Associate Lecturer with the Open University, covering a broad range of topics in the arts and humanities.

Contact: buckley.linda394@googlemail.com